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  • Written by DstryrSG

Dstryr Vs. Competidor brand

[div class="notice" class2="icon"]The following is from an article on DstryrSG, part of the MiddleEasy Network.[/div]


Alright, grapplers. Here we go with the 3rd installment of D/SG's Grappler's Interrogatories (the "GI's"). We're honored that Guam-based Competidor Brand, makers of fine kimonos and apparel, volunteered to have some fun with us and answer our interrogs.

For those who haven't checked out the first 2 GI's (see No. 0001 and No. 0003), here's a brief explanation: I've always been curious about the people behind the brands and other companies in our sport of BJJ/grappling. I wondered if they trained and what motivated them to do what they do (and whether they preferred fauxhawks to mullets). This is our attempt to find out a bit about the people involved in our sport and to have some fun with the interview concept.

So, let's get on with it. The GI's No. 0003, as completed by Competidor founder, Marvin Manibusan.

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How has your experience in BJJ influenced your approach to Competidor as a business?

I'm definitely not a high level / high belt ranking player, I'm just along for the knowledge and the ride. We also don't have a grip of black belts on our roster who can help us market the brand. So we're here to cater to the "middle class" of the sport (whites, blues, purples, etc.). They are the ones spending money, a lot of the black belts are already sponsored and get a crap load of free gear. We believe that they are the core of the sport... So were here on the ground level just trying to do some cool things and grow with the players who can relate to our brand. I think our followers see that and appreciate the grass-roots"ness"!

Do you have any advice for someone who has a business idea in a niche market like yours?

Do it well. There are so many guys out there that think they could just launch a brand over night. Their heart and desire may be in the right place, but everything else may just look really "half-ass." Suddenly, there brand has fallen by the wayside and forever forgotten. I'm definitely ALL-FOR a grassroots come-up and will support anyone who has a well-put together brand. However, do it right man. Take the time to know what you're getting into and what you're doing. Come up with a good design and well put together marketing plan. Don't just make a couple of tee shirts and think you have a brand. Of course, that was the model back when street wear began. But, nowadays we have all the avenues to make a start-up brand look PRO. Consumers appreciate that. Let's show these bigger companies that we could do exactly what there doing on the ground level and make some noise! Now we see a lot of the bigger companies trying to re model their company like us smaller guys. So please, take the time and DO IT RIGHT. Good luck and GO HARD.


Favorite BJJ Fighter of All Time?
When I hear "BJJ" and "Fighter" I think BJ "muthaf**kin PENN! Sure, there are a lot of players out there that I could name drop, which will make me sound really "jitsy." But, hands down... braddah BJ man. He represented jiu jitsu after it kinda lost it's noise and everyone was becoming these monster cross-training beasts. Jiu JItsu needed another star after Royce, and that's where BJ came in. 19-year old black belt wrecking shop! He bled, cried, lost, fought, scrapped, talked shit, fought anyone, threw shakas, won belts, tapped out the some of the greats, and just always put it on the line. He never was one to play it safe, he JUST SCRAPPED. He was definitely the peoples champ. #FAVS

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